Misinformation About
Parkinson's Clinics
Please note our rebuttals to some misinformation being spread about the Hinz Protocol of Parkinson's disease care

Misinformation About Parkinson's Clinics

We respect the efforts that people are making to ensure that care and research are being done, leading to the best and healthiest Parkinson's disease care. However, we find it unfortunate (and simply disturbing) that somebody who does not understand the science that this research has discovered would want to spread misinformation about our care and come between you and the desired course you'd like to live. Please note our rebuttals to some internet misinformation about the Hinz Protocol of Parkinson's disease care:


WEBSITE NOTES: It took three medical doctors working several hours a day, every day for three months to write the carbidopa B6 death paper. We are aware that QuackPot with no medical license contacted the Centres for Disease Control after reading our carbidopa B6 death paper. He found out we were correct with the death data. Then during this brief phone call, he then claimed the CDC (who has published nothing on this topic) communicated to him that the increased death rate could be from more people diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease.
ANSWER: This one is like comparing apples and oranges, not true. The data we reported was the prevalence of patients with Parkinson’s disease per 100,000. Contrary to the claims for QuackPot without a medical license, prevalence data is not affected by diagnosing more patients. For example, if the prevalence is six patients per 1,000 people have a disease. With the same prevalence, 60 patients in 10,000 will have the disease. The Center for Disease Control Parkinson’s disease death date as prevalence. Diagnosing more people will not affect the prevalence rate. QuackPot without a medical license throwing around untrue facts due to his lack of veracity only serves to confuse people looking for valid information.


WEBSITE NOTES: QuackPot without a medical license notes, “…advises patients and prospective patients to stop using carbidopa.”
ANSWER: Nowhere does this website advise patients to stop using carbidopa. That is an informed decision is between the patient and the doctors. Ultimately the decision to stop carbidopa or benserazide is up to the patient. Sitting squarely in science is the following:

  • Carbidopa and benserazide prescribing information notes, it can cause dyskinesias.
  • Carbidopa and benserazide irreversibly deplete vitamin B6
  • Carbidopa and benserazide irreversibly deplete vitamin B6 dependent enzymes
  • Carbidopa and benserazide can induce relative nutritional deficiency with symptoms identical to Parkinson’s disease
  • Carbidopa and benserazide may cause the 390% increase in the Parkinson’s death rate since 1976
  • Carbidopa and benserazide vitamin B6 depletion can compromise the function of over 300 enzymes and proteins
  • Carbidopa and benserazide may induce over 100 side effects.
  • Carbidopa and benserazide can collapse dopamine synthesis
  • Carbidopa and benserazide can collapse glutathione synthesis (thiol depletion)
  • Carbidopa and benserazide can collapse serotonin synthesis
  • Carbidopa and benserazide can collapse histamine synthesis
  • Carbidopa and benserazide can collapse phenylethylamine synthesis
  • Carbidopa and benserazide can collapse niacin synthesis
  • Carbidopa and benserazide can collapse norepinephrine synthesis
  • Carbidopa and benserazide can collapse epinephrine (adrenaline) synthesis

WEBSITE NOTES: QuackPot without a medical license lacks veracity, “...they had sought treatment because they were afraid that standard treatment might make them die sooner. Hinz is orchestrating this fear.”
ANSWER: If reading the science induces fear, it is not our doing. This website is merely reporting the scientific facts posted by the National Institute of Health.


WEBSITE NOTES: QuackPot without a medical license notes, “He is correct that the (Parkinson’s disease death rate) number has greatly increased but does not prove that carbidopa was responsible.”
ANSWER: The papers do not prove that carbidopa was the cause of the increase in Parkinson’s disease deaths. The carbidopa B6 death paper does outline a valid set of concerns. 1) Carbidopa is known to cause vitamin B6 depletion 2) Vitamin B6 depletion causes an increased death rate. There has been no publishing of an alternative explanation for the huge (390%) increase in the Parkinson’s disease rate. The Center for Disease Control data, which documents a 390% increase in the Parkinson’s death rate since 1976, has left even the Director of the National Parkinson’s Disease Foundation flat-footed. When asked about the carbidopa B6 death paper Director Michael Okun, MD noted, “I am not aware of an increase in death rate with Parkinson’s disease with carbidopa, levodopa or any other PD drug or surgery. These approaches tend to help with symptoms and the presumption is probably the other way (they reduce the death rate).” The position of the Medical Director of a National Organization is an embarrassment. Michael Okun, MD Director of the National Parkinson’s Foundation, is not aware of Center for Disease Control data. Okun, while out there shooting from the hip is promoting false scientific facts. He is trying to get people to believe that the Center for Disease Control death data is not reliable or valid.


WEBSITE NOTES: QuackPot without a medical license notes, “…can be helped with dietary supplements sold by (a specific nutrition company).
ANSWER: Nowhere on this website is any promotion of nutrients sold by a specific company made.


WEBSITE NOTES: QuackPot without a medical license is skeptical because “The scientific community recognizes a few rare inherited neurotransmitter diseases that involve inborn errors of metabolism or transport. These are not included on the lists that Hinz's network has published."
ANSWER: This is fake news from out of left field. Inherited neurotransmitter diseases have nothing to do with this research discussed on this website. These are two completely different topics. The assertion puts on display for all to see how little the QuackPot without a medical license knows about monoamine and thiol related relative nutritional deficiencies, which has nothing to do with inborn errors of metabolism. It would be the same as if we were writing about cars then QuackPot without a medical license started claiming he is skeptical about our car writings because we did not also write about birch trees. Some things do not make sense.


WEBSITE NOTES: QuackPot without a medical license notes, “I have been unable to find any research that supports the methods he recommends treat them. The journal articles he has cited certainly do not." QuackPot also notes, ” “I asked whether any controlled clinical trial has ever demonstrated a favorable health outcome produced by one of his protocols. He replied that there are none.” Finally, QuackPot notes, “ If treatment methods were valid, he should be able to cite dozens of well-designed clinical trials that validate them. Despite extensive searching on PubMed and with Google, I have found none."
ANSWER: The problem is that QuackPot without a medical license does not have adequate searchability. A second problem appears to be that the QuackPot without a medical license cannot read the science. Start by reading the webpage on this website, “the effectiveness of L-dopa from various sources.” The National Institute of Health has done a fine job demonstrating that the nonprescription form L-dopa is “similar to” or “as effective as” the prescription L-dopa. Imagine that L-dopa is as effective as L-dopa. Next search Google Scholar for “Parkinson’s disease L-dopa double-blind,” and you will find a wealth of studies, 24,100 to be exact. Since QuackPot without a medical license is without research training and has never been lead author publishing one peer-reviewed original research medical paper, it is apparent that the expertise required for valid peer-review on his part is lacking.
Further lacking is that twenty-five years ago QuackPot without a medical license experienced circumstances that forced him to give up his active medical license. He has no medical license but claims he has the expert ability to peer-review licensed medical doctors. By definition, peer-review is the process whereby doctors with a medical license review the medical care of other doctors with medical licenses. QuackPot without a medical license left the peer-review club of those with a medical license over 25 years ago and had no valid license credentials to support claims he is an expert that can perform valid peer-review of the care given provided by medical doctors. Our opinion is that his claims are unfounded hype with no dedication to veracity.


WEBSITE NOTES: QuackPot without a medical license notes, (Regarding the cost of nutrients sold in the clinic) “Based on the data I have collected so far, it appears that patients are being charged considerably more than what their practitioner pays for them.”
ANSWER: The logic evades us here. If this argument were applied to the business models of Walmart, Walgreens, or any other retailer, demanding that the customer be charged only what the company paid for the product, there would be no employees, store, lights, heat, no ability to pay bills, etc. QuackPot without a medical license is at this moment challenged to open a store that sells products for the cost paid he for them, then stay in business for at least five years.

To read more about QuackPot go to: http://www.quackpotwatch.org/quackpots/quackpots/barrett.htm 

For more information on our approach to Parkinson’s disease send an email to info@parkinsonsclinics.com or call 218-626-2220. After you send your email, we may ask for more information. All communications will be kept confidential. If you have any questions, please call us free of charge.

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