Relative Nutritional
Deficiencies
The following is an overview of the known significant depletions (relative nutritional deficiencies) which can occur relating to Parkinson’s disease, L-dopa, and carbidopa.

Parkinson's Disease-Related Relative Nutritional Deficiencies

A relative nutritional deficiency (RND) occurs whenever an optimal diet does not meet the needs of the system. Whenever a significant systemic depletion occurs on an optimal diet (regular diet) it represents a relative nutritional deficiency of one or more of the nutrients required by the body to synthesize the depleted substance.

In the competitive inhibition state interaction between the serotonin system, dopamine system, and thiols (sulfur-containing amino acids) are codependent. Changes to concentrations of one system will induce changes to the other systems. When depletion occurs on an optimal diet, it represents a relative nutritional deficiency of the nutrients required to compensate for the depletion. With Parkinson’s disease, inadequate dopamine concentrations while on an optimal diet represent a relative nutritional deficiency of the nutrients the body requires to make dopamine. The status of the amino acid nutrient L-dopa and vitamin B6, which the body needs to make dopamine, determines the severity of Parkinson’s disease symptoms. It is a universal truth of science that only nutrients are effective in managing the cause of nutrition deficiency. The aromatic amino acid L-dopa is a nutrient. All the drugs used with Parkinson’s disease patients are not nutrients and do not supply the body with the nutrients it needs to make more dopamine.

The following is an overview outlining some of the known significant depletions (relative nutritional deficiencies) which can occur relating to Parkinson’s disease, L-dopa, and carbidopa.

Parkinson’s disease Related RND

Significant depletion represents a relative nutritional deficiency of the nutrients required to make the depleted substance.

  • Carbidopa binds irreversibly to vitamin B6 and vitamin B6-dependent enzymes, effectively removing (depleting) them from a further function in the system. Carbidopa is very effective at inducing a vitamin B6 relative nutritional deficiency while on an optimal diet (B6 USRDA about 2 mg per day).
  • “The Baker Study” page on this website discusses how symptoms of vitamin B6 deficiency (depletion) in the Parkinson’s disease patient can be identical to Parkinson’s disease symptoms.
  • The “carbidopa and dyskinesias” page of this website documents how permanent, irreversible dyskinesia side effects suffered by Parkinson’s disease patients are not primarily due to L-dopa as previously thought. Clinical experience reveals they are due to carbidopa-induced B6 depletion.
  • The “carbidopa side effects” page of this website discusses how carbidopa side effects, which may be due to depletion, may be identical to Parkinson’s disease symptoms.
  • The “carbidopa B6 and death rate” page of this website discusses the hypothesis that the 390% increase in the Parkinson’s disease death rate may be from carbidopa-induced vitamin B6 depletion. Vitamin B6 depletion is known to correlate with an increased death rate among the all-cause group.

Parkinson Dopamine Depletion #1  Parkinson Dopamine Depletion #2

Parkinson’s disease and glutathione: The cause of Parkinson’s disease is permanent damage to the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra in the brain. High on the list of causes is toxins, to be specific, fat-soluble neurotoxins found in the environment. There are almost 1,200 neurotoxins identified. They are everywhere in environments which have been manipulated by man. The most powerful protection against neurotoxins is the naturally occurring substance found in your body, glutathione. Glutathione depletion is one of the earliest biochemical changes observed in Parkinson’s disease. Glutathione collapse leaves the door wide open to permanent damage in a brain not protected properly by glutathione. The brain damage causing Parkinson’s disease will then get worse at an accelerated rate as neurotoxins do their damage without adequate glutathione protection. Significant depletion of glutathione while on an optimal diet represents a relative nutritional deficiency of thiol amino acid precursors and vitamin B6.

Parkinson Glutathione Depletion #1  Parkinson Glutathione Depletion #2  Parkinson Glutathione Depletion #3


L-dopa Related RND

L-dopa and serotonin: Through competitive inhibition, L-dopa is known to deplete serotonin when administered on a short-term and long-term basis. Some of the side effects attributed to L-dopa are an imbalance between serotonin and dopamine induced by L-dopa. Serotonin side effects may be confused with dopamine side effects. As a daily dosing value of the amino acid L-dopa increases a side effect occurs, that is blamed on L-dopa when in fact the problem is on the serotonin side. It has been reported in the literature when serotonin depletion is too great the benefits of L-dopa will be compromised or not available. Significant serotonin depletion while on an optimal diet represent a relative nutritional deficiency of serotonin amino acid precursors or vitamin B6.

L-dopa and Serotonin Depletion #1  L-dopa and Serotonin Depletion #2  L-dopa and Serotonin Depletion #3  L-dopa and Serotonin Depletion #4  L-dopa and Serotonin Depletion #5

L-dopa and glutathione: To understand the importance of glutathione, see the Parkinson’s disease glutathione discussion above. Parkinson’s disease patients have depleted glutathione. L-dopa depletes and compounds glutathione in the Parkinson’s disease patient. Glutathione depletion represents a double hit on the glutathione system which is required to defend the body from fat-soluble neurotoxins. If significant glutathione depletion occurs, while on an optimal diet it represents a relative nutritional deficiency of glutathione amino acid precursors or vitamin B6.

L-dopa and Glutathione Depletion #1  L-dopa and Glutathione Depletion #2


Carbidopa Related RND

Carbidopa and vitamin B6: Carbidopa binds irreversibly to vitamin B6 and vitamin B6-depenend enzymes, effectively removing them from further function in the system. Carbidopa can induce vitamin B6 depletion. When vitamin B6 depletion occurs on an optimal diet it represents a relative nutritional deficiency of vitamin B6.

Carbidopa Depletes Vitamin B6 #1  Carbidopa Depletes Vitamin B6 #2  Carbidopa Depletes Vitamin B6 #3

Carbidopa and serotonin: Serotonin synthesis requires the vitamin B6 dependent enzyme AADC. Carbidopa irreversibly binds to then depletes AADC. Other functions performed by AADC serotonin synthesis, dopamine synthesis, and histamine synthesis. When significant serotonin depletion occurs, while on an optimal diet it represents a relative nutritional deficiency of serotonin amino acid precursors or vitamin B6.

Carbidopa may Deplete Serotonin

Carbidopa and dopamine: Dopamine synthesis requires the vitamin B6 dependent enzyme AADC. Carbidopa irreversibly binds to then depletes AADC. Other functions performed by AADC serotonin synthesis, dopamine synthesis, and histamine synthesis. When significant dopamine depletion occurs, while on an optimal diet it represents a relative nutritional deficiency of dopamine amino acid precursors or vitamin B6.

Carbidopa Depletes Dopamine

Carbidopa and norepinephrine: Carbidopa irreversibly binds to and deactivates the peripheral vitamin B6-dependent enzyme AADC which responsible for dopamine synthesis. AADC metabolized dopamine to norepinephrine. When significant norepinephrine depletion occurs on an optimal diet, it represents a relative nutritional deficiency of L-dopa or vitamin B6.

Carbidopa Depletes Norepinephrine

 

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